Bats, Bees, and Butterflies: Week 1, Day 1

Hi everyone!

Since this week is Bats, Bees, and Butterflies week, everyday we are going to go through a different part of the butterfly life cycle. Today we are beginning as a butterfly egg. A cool fact about butterfly eggs is that sometimes if you look closely you can actually see the caterpillar growing in them. Most different types of butterflies lay different eggs, some are round, some are oval, and some have ridges.

A "Caterpillar" milks the dairy goat

A “Caterpillar” milks the dairy goat

We met the animals this morning while doing chores! We milked goats, fed chickens, and fed kid goats. Did you know that more people worldwide drink goat’s milk? It can be used as a substitute for people who are allergic to cow’s milk.

An "egg" peels garlic for their pesto

An “egg” peels garlic for their pesto

An "egg" gets his homemade noodles and pesto for their garden kitchen snack

An “egg” gets his homemade noodles and pesto for their garden kitchen snack

A "caterpillar" kneads the dough for their pasta

A “caterpillar” kneads the dough for their pasta

In morning garden kitchen, we made pesto with pasta. We used different types of flour and learned that flour can come from many different things, but usually comes from ground up seeds. To help dough keep it’s elasticity you can put it in the fridge.

Ms. Carrie shows off a chicken to the "chrysalis" group

Ms. Carrie shows off a chicken to the “chrysalis” group

A "chrysalis" pets a chicken

A “chrysalis” pets a chicken

We fed the chickens, but we also learned more about them. We learned that the color of a chicken’s earlobe determines their egg color. Their lobes are usually hidden behind their feathers right behind the eyes.

An "egg" pours milk to make ricotta cheese

An “egg” pours milk to make ricotta cheese

The "eggs" watch Ms. Mandy separate the curds and whey with cheesecloth

The “eggs” watch Ms. Mandy separate the curds and whey with cheesecloth

In afternoon garden kitchen, we made ricotta cheese with apples to dip in it. The word ricotta means recooked. It is cheese that is cooked until it is 180 degrees and then vinegar is added and the fat in the milk solidifies.

The "butterflies" learn about radishes from Ms. Andrea

The “butterflies” learn about radishes from Ms. Andrea

In the afternoon, we had more garden time and learned about root vegetables. The Greek word for the scientific genus that radishes are part of means “quickly growing.”

The "eggs" learn about plants in the forest

The “eggs” explored the forest for plants in the forest

We discovered on our five senses hike that deer will only move about five feet when they are startled in the woods. There were a lot of cool sounds from the rain drops hitting the leaves.

See you tomorrow!!

Garden Kitchen Recipes

Sunflower Pesto

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup raw shelled sunflower seeds
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 cups (packed) arugula leaves
  • 1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Kosher salt

Rinse sunflower seeds, put in a small bowl or jar, and add cold water to cover seeds by 1 inch. Cover; soak overnight at room temperature. Drain and rinse seeds.
Purée sunflower seeds, garlic, arugula, basil, oil, honey, and lemon zest and juice until smooth. Season with salt. Thin pesto with water if too thick.

Eggless Pasta

Ingredients

  • 2 cups semolina flour
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 to 1 1/4 cups tepid water

Mound the flour in the center of a large wooden cutting board. Make a well in the center of the flour and add water a little at a time, stirring with your hands until a dough is formed. As you incorporate the water, keep pushing the flour up to retain the well shape (do not worry if it looks messy). The dough will come together in a shaggy mass when about half of the flour is incorporated. You may need more or less water, depending on the humidity in your kitchen.

Start kneading the dough with both hands, primarily using the palms of your hands. Once the dough is a cohesive mass, remove the dough from the board and scrape up any left over dry bits. Lightly flour the board and continue kneading for 3 more minutes. The dough should be elastic and a little sticky. Continue to knead for another 3 minutes, remembering to dust your board with flour when necessary. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside for 10 minutes at room temperature. Roll and form as desired.

Ricotta

Ingredients

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons good white wine vinegar

Set a large sieve over a deep bowl. Dampen 2 layers of cheesecloth with water and line the sieve with the cheesecloth.

Pour the milk and cream into a stainless-steel or enameled pot such as Le Creuset. Stir in the salt. Bring to a full boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Turn off the heat and stir in the vinegar. Allow the mixture to stand for 1 minute until it curdles. It will separate into thick parts (the curds) and milky parts (the whey).

Pour the mixture into the cheesecloth-lined sieve and allow it to drain into the bowl at room temperature for 20 to 25 minutes, occasionally discarding the liquid that collects in the bowl. The longer you let the mixture drain, the thicker the ricotta. (I tend to like mine on the thicker side, but some prefer it moister.) Transfer the ricotta to a bowl, discarding the cheesecloth and any remaining whey. Use immediately or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. The ricotta will keep refrigerated for 4 to 5 days.

 

3 thoughts on “Bats, Bees, and Butterflies: Week 1, Day 1

  1. Sounds like a fantastic day of learning and exploring at the Bats, Bees, and Butterflies Camp!

  2. Sounds like a fantastic day of learning and exploring at the Bats, Bees and Butterflies Camp!

  3. Patrick and Nadia are so excited to try the recipes at home. Great idea for the weekend!!